It just occured to me how dependent we are on the advice of experts. And how easy it is for them to tell us what's good for us and what's not.

Seth Godin – I read his blog often, looking for words and ideas that will make me feel good. For words that motivate and reassure me. One of his latest posts was, funny enough, on the reassurance of the lizard brain in us, and how this brain holds us back from just moving forward.

.How easy it is to do something once you've already reached the goal, already got the results in from your efforts, and they've proved successful.

I'm a fan of Seth Godin – but it's easy for him to talk – he's got his success, he doesn't have to struggle – he doesn't have to face doubt, ride on hope – if something new doesn't work, he's still got his success to back him.

It's easy for him to say – go out and just do it, be courageous, believe in yourself – when it's already worked for him.

For the rest of us, we're still at the beginning – we're hoping for success but there's no guarantee that we'll succeed. We're still facing the dangers, we've still got the obstacles to climb over, still got the fear to conquer.

I know this because I quit my job and I'm putting all my hopes in my dream of creating an online income. I also know this because I have just finished a workout program to get rid of my bodyfat and build me a new, better looking, better functioning body.

In the first case I'm still haunted by thoughts of “what if this doesn't work?” And it doesn't matter how much I read Seth Godin's insightful and motivating words – all the pressure is still on me and I know it won't go away until I've got the outcome I hope so desperately for.

In the second case I've succeeded, and I never have to go through that process again. I'll still have to watch my diet, and I'll still have to exercise to stay in shape – but I know it works for me, I know I can make it work, I know I have the control to get the results I want.

So I share this with others – and I offer advice, saying – believe in yourself, be courageous, and go out and just do it. And I realize that it's easy for me to talk – I've got my success, I don't have to struggle, face doubt, ride on hope.

What this tells us, tells me, is that ultimately we are alone. We can search and find motivating words, find our rolemodels and heroes, follow their advice and use their tactics, use their stories and successes to comfort us in our own trials... but we are alone. We still have to take our own steps, and we won't feel release from the pressure until we get the outcome we hope so desperately for.

 
An old friend once insinuated (20 years ago) I was a loser because I hadn't accumulated as much"wealth" as he had at the time (big car, big house, big income...). I told him there was plenty of time... no hurry.
That friend passed away a little while ago at 52 years of age.

Another friend admitted to me, when we were both 30, that he'd given up on his dream of becoming a rockstar... and advised me to do the same, saying we were both too old.

As a youth, I told everyone that I intended to be a millionaire by the time I was 30. I wasn't. My sister has never let me forget it. My response is that there is still time, and what does it matter if I'm a little late.

I have to admit, I still cherish my dreams - I believe there's always time. Older people than me are creating million-dollar businesses on the internet. Others older than me have made their first albums, distributed them over the internet and been "discovered" on YouTube.

How could I give up on my dreams while others are achieving them?

There is never really a time to give up, and you're never to old to start. Life is not over til it's over.

What would you rather have - a million dollars at 75, or never?
What would you rather have - to get fit, healthy and slim after 50... or never?
 
A friend of mine told me the other day that she's always wanted to play the saxophone.
I asked her if she had one - she said no.
I asked her if she thought she could learn without one - again she said no.
I told her it was probably a good idea, then, to get one, learn to blow it, then learn to play it... she agreed.

Wanting, wasn't going to help her learn - only doing. All the years she'd spent not having a saxophone, all the hours of practice she'd had not learning to play it, hasn't gotten her anywhere. One day she may stop wanting - but that would be a shame.

In the same way... wanting to lose weight, to get fitter, to build muscle, to get more flexible, to be more active, to learn to ski or skydive, eat healthier, improve your life, change your life - whatever - is futile, until you start doing something about it.

Not doing, only feeds the wanting, and leaves you feeling miserable. Without "doing", often the only other option is to discard the "want", file it away under "dreams unfulfilled", and try to forget you ever wanted it, while watching how the gap fills up with the unpleasantness of regret.

Stop wanting - start doing. It really is as simple as that.